The Be Free of Hep C campaign is developed and funded by Gilead Sciences Ltd

Be Free of Hep C

Hepatitis C can do serious damage to your liver without you knowing.1
Take action before it’s too late.

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Find out if you’re at risk – and what you can do about it

Hepatitis C is a virus that infects and damages the liver.2 If left untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), liver cancer and death.1

The virus is spread through exposure to infected blood and the symptoms can go unnoticed for many years.1

If you think you might be at risk, talk to your GP or healthcare provider to arrange a free test.

If you know you are hepatitis C positive, talk to your GP or healthcare provider about treatment options.

Get tested. Get treated. Get cured.

Who's at risk ?

People usually catch hepatitis C when they come into contact with the blood of an infected person.1

  • Have you been exposed to an unclean drug vial or unsterilised needle?

    For example getting a tattoo, piercing or injecting drugs (including steroids). It’s estimated 49% of people in England who inject drugs have hepatitis C – and just one injection is enough to become infected.2

  • Have you had medical or dental treatment in a high-risk area?

    High-risk areas include China, South and Southeast Asia, North Africa and Russia.3

  • Did you have a blood transfusion before 1992?

    Since September 1991, all blood donated in the UK has been checked for the hepatitis C virus. However, if you received a blood transfusion or blood products before then, you may be at risk. 4

You should get tested if you fall into one of these at-risk groups.5

What are the symptoms?

Many people show no symptoms. You should still get tested if you think you are at risk.5

Although these symptoms are not unique to hepatitis C, some people can experience:6

  • An intense tiredness (fatigue)
  • ‘Brain fogginess’ and problems concentrating
  • Joint and muscle pain
  • Loss of appetite and/or feeling sick
  • Feeling depressed or anxious, or having mood swings
  • Indigestion or stomach pain
  • Itchy skin
  • Flu like symptoms
  • Jaundice

For more information and support, visit The Hepatitis C Trust

Talk to
your GP

Getting treated

  • Get tested

    Talk to your GP or healthcare provider about a free test

  • Get treated

    If you are hepatitis C positive, most treatment periods last 12 weeks or less7

  • Be hep C free

    Once treatment is complete, over 95% of people are cured8

Find out more about treatment

Find out
about testing

For more information and support, visit The Hepatitis C Trust

Talk to
your GP

Find out more about treatment

Find out
about testing